Last edited by Tamuro
Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

6 edition of African Elephant Status Report 2002 found in the catalog.

African Elephant Status Report 2002

An Update From The African Elephant Database

by R.F.W. Barnes

  • 72 Want to read
  • 9 Currently reading

Published by World Conservation Union .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Conservation of wildlife & habitats,
  • Animals,
  • Environmental Conservation & Protection - General,
  • Nature / Environmental Conservation & Protection,
  • Wildlife,
  • Nature,
  • Nature/Ecology

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages301
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL12610836M
    ISBN 102831707072
    ISBN 109782831707075

    In , the African Elephant Database was initiated with the aim to monitor the status of African elephant populations. This database includes results from aerial surveys, dung counts, interviews with local people and data on : Mammalia. The African Elephant Status Report of deliberately made no distinction between savannah elephants and forest elephants when it estimates how many elephants there were, and the report’s Position Paper makes it clear that as far as possible elephant hybrids are concerned, it doesn’t even want to go there.

    The North African names (berbericus, hannibali, pharaohensis) were placed in this synonymy instead of under L. cyclotis per suggestion of Colin Groves (pers. comm., ) Status: CITES - Appendix II for Botswana, Namibia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe, Appendix I for other African countries; U.S. ESA - Threatened; IUCN - EndangeredBiological classification: Species.   Kruger National Park in South Africa, which spends over $ million annually on anti-poaching, has the most highly-trained and dedicated anti-poaching force in Africa.

      According to the African Elephant Status Report, a document put out by a group of elephant researchers, there are currently over , elephants in Africa. It is not possible to know exactly how many elephants there are in the entire continent because individuals are born and die every day and sometimes animals are missed when a count is. Quick Reference: The African Elephant Facts & Risks FREE please share – Written by Nikela Volunteer Rossy Yang – – Sept 3 Interesting Facts The African elephants are the world’s largest land mammals; they can weigh up to 6 tons, measure up to a whopping 11 feet at shoulder height, and.


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African Elephant Status Report 2002 by R.F.W. Barnes Download PDF EPUB FB2

About this book The African elephant is the largest living land mammal, and its potential impact on habitats raises important management issues both for protected areas and unprotected land. This Status Report, derived from data contained in the African Elephant Database, provides continent-wide information on numbers, distribution and current conservation issues.

The African elephant is the largest living land mammal, and their potential impact on their habitats raises important management issues both for protected areas and unprotected land. This Status Report, derived from data contained in the African Elephant Database, is rich in data and information on numbers, distribution and current issues, and provides continent-wide.

Get this from a library. African elephant status report an update from the African Elephant Database. [J J Blanc; IUCN/SSC African Elephant Specialist Group.; IUCN--The World Conservation Union.;]. The African Elephant Status Report provides the world’s most authoritative and comprehensive source of knowledge on the distribution and abu ndance of the African elephant at the national.

Gland: IUCN, Quarto, paperback, tables, maps. The African elephant is the largest living land mammal, and their potential impact on their habitats raises important management issues both for protected areas and unprotected land.

This report is rich in data and information on numbers, distribution and current issues, and provides continent-wide information that is vital. The African Elephant Status Report provides the world’s most authoritative and comprehensive source of knowledge on the distribution and abundance of the African elephant at the national, regional and continental levels.

It is the most recent in a series of reports that began in with the African Elephant Action Plan (Douglas-Hamilton, b).File Size: 8MB. The African elephant is the largest living land mammal, and their potential impact on their habitats raises important management issues both for protected areas and unprotected land.

This Status Report, derived from data contained in the African Elephant Database, is rich in data and information on numbers, distribution and current issues, and provides continent-wide Cited by: PDF | OnChris R Thouless and others published African Elephant Status Report an update from the African Elephant Database.

| Find, read and. The IUCN moved African elephants from endangered to vulnerable status inin part because the animals are relatively numerous, with someAfrican elephants roaming the continent, and.

African Elephant Status Report II The designation of geographical entities in this book, and the presentation of the material, do not imply the expression of any opinion continental populations between and across the 37 range states of the African elephant. Importantly this report not only provides information on changes.

J.J. Blanc, C.R. Thouless, J.A. Hart, H.T. Dublin, I. Douglas-Hamilton, G.C. Craig and R.F.W. Barnes. Explore the full text of the report (PDF) and its errata. Roland Smith is an American author of young adult fiction as well as nonfiction books for children.

Smith was born in Portland, Oregon, and graduated from Portland State University and, following a part-time job at the Oregon Zoo in Portland, began a year career as a zookeeper, both at the Oregon Zoo and the Point Defiance Zoo in Tacoma, Washington/5(3).

This incredible collection of over photographs, reveals the fascinating lives of African elephants, their individual behavior, and even their intriguing social relationships. AFRICAN ELEPHANTS is truly a remarkable chronicle of this majestic creature, a book that is only surpassed by the incredible photography exhibited by: 1.

Forest elephants, a distinct subspecies of African elephants, are uniquely adapted to the forest habitat of the Congo Basin, but are in sharp decline due to poaching for the international ivory trade.

African elephants are the largest land animals on Earth. They are slightly larger than their Asian cousins and can be identified by their larger ears that look somewhat like the continent of Africa.

Inas many as 10 million wild elephants roamed huge swaths of the African continent. But decades of poaching and conflict have since decimated African elephant populations. Inexperts estimated that Africa’s elephant population had dropped byelephants in the span of a decade.

Today, there are justelephants across. National Geographic Book of Mammals. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic Society, H.T. Douglas-Hamilton, I., Craig, C.G., Barnes, R.F.W. "African Elephant Status Report An Update from the African Elephant Database" IUCN The World Conservation Union No.

29 Chadwick, Douglas H. () The Fate of the Elephant San Francisco. A "comprehensive African Elephant Status Report (AESR) is expected to be published some time in " based on their current data.

African elephants are distinguished from Asians in several ways. The most noticeable difference is the ears. Africans' ears are much larger and are shaped like the continent of their : Mammalia. The rapid decline of the African elephant in the s and s provoked serious concern about the long-term survival of the species.

This concern highlighted the need to monitor and report on the continent-wide status of elephant populations. The African Elephant Database (AED) evolved to meet this need.

It is the only database that stores. The complexities of the current status of the African elephant defy simple solutions. Practical management and conservation strategies, based on solid scientific information, and an understanding of the human element in elephant conservation, offer the best hope for the future of Africa’s greatest living mammal.

This report presents a summary and. Saving African elephants from poaching and trade. By Dr. Ross Harvey – Independent Economist, University of Cape Town Botswana hides behind national “sovereignty” while selling off its natural heritage to foreign hunters and treating [ ].Elephants continue to roam across much of Africa, but these magnificent animals remain under severe threat from poaching, habitat loss, and human-wildlife conflict.

African elephants are the world's largest land animals. The biggest can be up to m long, m high at the shoulder, and 6 tonnes in weight. The trunk is an extension of the upper.The data used for this update is housed in the African Elephant Database (AED), the most comprehensive database on the conservation status of the African elephant which is now housed within a ‘global’ elephant database - the AAED.

The rapid online publication of survey results as they are received is a new feature of the database.